Google your novel title


So… You’ve just written the first draft of a new novel. Kudos. You’ve slaved and sweated and cried and bled for those pages. You’ve spent hours divining the perfect word, splicing Greek terms together to make your own, editing, reediting, deleting, creating again. You’re excited, proud, and bloody exhausted.

But your work has just begun. Now begins the grueling stint of refining and finalizing. Before you begin pouring back over those pages though, stop and Google your title and any words you may have created. Names make a huge impact on the rest of the story, but you don’t want to get your manuscript to an editor’s desk only to have it rejected because you’ve used a copyrighted term. Now is the time to discover if you need to edit a character around a new name, not after you’re half way through revision. Google the title of your novel right now. Go on, I’ll wait… No, now click on page 2. … Uh-huh, now 3. Yes, and 4. Okay, that should be good, but feel free to look further. If you found anything similar or anything that made you go “Ugh!” then it’s time for more word splicing.

Happy hunting.

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11 Comments

  1. Haven’t done this yet, but the title of my novel is a very common word so I know it’s going to come up a lot on a search. But, I thought a title chosen by the author for the most part was just a working title anyway – don’t they change them at will? I’ve never had one published, haven’t even had one ready to submit yet. Hoping to start doing that by summer next year, though, so I guess I’m in for a whole new learning curve.

  2. You’ve reminded me of a fantasy name I created in 1999, Kazdan, only to discover years later it’s an actual (albeit rare) surname.

      1. Well, perhaps it could be used. It would be like how Aslan means “lion” in Turkish and hardly anyone knows that.

        You’re welcome.

  3. Oh, I’d be mad if I had to change any character’s names.

    I did have to change one, because one of my beta partners informed me that it meant something else in another language. It made a few sentances really funny.

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